Legal Aid's New Cop Accountability Project Featured In NY Daily News Article
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 2014

The New York Daily News carried a story today about the Society's new Cop Accountability Project. Tina Luongo, Attorney-in-Charge of the Society's Criminal Practice, said that the new program comes at a pivotal time. “I think we’re at a moment where the general public isn’t buying that anymore,” Luongo told the Daily News. "You can make that claim all you want when there is no transparency, but you can’t when the video (goes online).”

The Legal Aid Society's Cop Accountability Project is a roll out of improvements to its data collection, data quality and internal system reporting of police misconduct for future criminal and impact litigation, policy reform and media advocacy. It allows immediate access to original source documents, including Brady letters, federal civil rights lawsuits and more. Our defense attorneys are already using this access to litigate Brady demands and move for police personnel records, to cross examine police witnesses and negotiate better pleas. CAP will also create substantive reports about discriminatory policing, individual officers' arrest histories and policing trends of certain charges for our community partners, politicians, law-makers and reporters.




NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
NYPD cops accused of wrongdoing will have information collected into Legal Aid Society's database
BY Rocco Parascandola
November 27, 2014

The NYPD has another layer of accountability to deal with — the Legal Aid Society has created a database of cops who behave badly.

The group’s lawyers, who represent those who can’t afford to pay for an attorney, contend police do a poor job tracking cops who are accused of wrongdoing and repeatedly sued.

The Cop Accountability Program, or CAP, will collect information about cops accused of wrongdoing, then share it with Legal Aid lawyers and attorneys from outside firms.

Tina Luongo, an attorney in charge at Legal Aid, said CAP comes at a pivotal time — with New Yorkers less likely to believe the contention that most lawsuits and allegations against police are frivolous.

“I think we’re at a moment where the general public isn’t buying that anymore,” Luongo said. “You can make that claim all you want when there is no transparency, but you can’t when the video (goes online).”

Cynthia Conti-Cook, who is running CAP, said Legal Aid has already uploaded 2,750 entries into its database — everything from lawsuits and Civilian Complain Review Board histories to judges’ rulings and newspaper stories.

The NYPD did not respond to a request for comment.